Company formation in the Czech Republic

Embark on a transformative journey to establish your business in the Czech Republic with the unparalleled expertise and support of Regulated United Europe. Our comprehensive services are meticulously designed to guide you through the entire process of company formation, unlocking the strategic advantages inherent in this central European hub.

Choosing the Czech Republic as your business destination places you at the heart of Europe, providing strategic access to neighbouring markets and fostering efficient trade and distribution across the continent. Regulated United Europe ensures that the establishment of your company aligns seamlessly with local regulations, offering a secure and conducive environment for businesses of all sizes.

The Czech Republic stands out for its stable political environment and business-friendly policies, providing an ideal foundation for your company’s operations. Our team at Regulated United Europe is committed to navigating the intricacies of local regulations, ensuring your business complies with all legal requirements. This allows you to focus entirely on your core operations without unnecessary bureaucratic hurdles.

One of the key strengths of the Czech Republic is its highly skilled and educated workforce, making it a genuine hub of innovation. With a strong emphasis on education and technological advancements, the country boasts a pool of talent ready to contribute to the success of your business. Regulated United Europe not only facilitates compliance with employment regulations but also assists in recruiting top-tier professionals for your team.

PACKAGE «Company registration in the Czech Republic»

1,500 EUR
  • Preparation of necessary documents for registration of a new company in the Czech Republic
  • Acquisition of a legal address for the company
  • Translation of a certificate of no criminal record into Czech through a sworn translator
  • Payment of state fees related to company registration
  • Payment of notary fees related to company registration
  • Registration of the Company under the law
  • Legal address for 1 year

Open business in Czech Republic

Advantages

Fast project implementation time

Possibility to purchase an off-the-shelf solution

No share capital requirement

No obligatory local staff member

Advantages of Establishing Your Company in the Czech Republic:

  • Strategic Location: The Czech Republic, situated at the heart of Europe, boasts a strategically advantageous location, facilitating access to various European markets. This central positioning enhances the efficiency of product and service distribution throughout the region.
  • Robust Infrastructure: The nation features a modern and well-developed infrastructure encompassing roadways, railways, and airports. This infrastructure excellence ensures seamless transportation of goods and easy mobility for employees.
  • Skilled Workforce: The Czech Republic is endowed with a highly educated and skilled workforce, particularly in fields such as engineering, information technology, and manufacturing. This intellectual capital contributes significantly to the competitiveness of businesses operating within the country.
  • Competitive Labour Costs: Despite a gradual increase in recent years, labour costs in the Czech Republic remain competitive when compared to other Western European nations. This cost-effectiveness is conducive to achieving economic viability and sustainability for businesses.
  • Favourable Tax Incentives: The Czech government has implemented a range of fiscal incentives designed to attract foreign investment. These incentives include reductions in corporate income tax and various other benefits, fostering a tax-friendly environment for businesses.

Czech Republic

capital

Capital

population

Population

currency

Currency

gdp

GDP

Prague 10,516,707  CZK $28,095

Why you should consider registering a company in the Czech Republic?

 Czech Republic

The Czech Republic presents a highly attractive destination for company formation, thanks to a combination of strategic, economic, and workforce-related advantages. Nestled in the heart of Europe, its strategic geographic location offers unparalleled access to major European markets, making it an ideal hub for businesses aiming to expand their reach across the continent. The nation boasts a robust and stable economy, characterized by steady growth, which creates a thriving environment for a diverse range of business sectors, from manufacturing to technology and services. One of the Czech Republic’s standout features is its highly skilled and educated workforce. The availability of multilingual, technically proficient professionals is a significant asset for any enterprise. Furthermore, the Czech government’s pro-business stance, manifested in policies designed to attract foreign investment, creates a favourable business environment. These policies include tax incentives, support for research and development, and streamlined bureaucratic procedures, all of which facilitate easier and more efficient business operations. Additionally, the country’s well-developed infrastructure supports business activities, ensuring that companies operating in the Czech Republic have the necessary tools and systems to succeed.

Required Documentation for Registering a Company in the Czech Republic:

  • Chosen name for the company.
  • Registered office address, supported by proof (such as a lease agreement).
  • Description of the company’s intended business activities.
  • Memorandum and Articles of Association (MAA).
  • Certificate of trade authorization.
  • Sample signatures from the shareholders and directors.
  • Evidence of capital deposited in a bank.
  • Criminal record extract for each company member.

What types of companies exist in the Czech Republic?

In the Czech Republic, entrepreneurs can choose from a variety of forms of legal entities for doing business, each of which has its own peculiarities, requirements to the founding capital, management structure and taxation. This gives the opportunity to choose the most suitable option based on the specifics of the business, plans for its development and strategy to minimise tax deductions. In this article we will look at the main types of companies that can be registered in the Czech Republic.

  1. individual entrepreneur (Živnostenské podnikání)

This is the easiest way to start a business for a sole proprietor. A sole proprietor does not require any initial capital and is registered in the Commercial Register (Živnostenský rejstřík). The entrepreneur has unlimited liability for his/her obligations with all his/her property.

  1. limited liability company (Společnost s ručením omezeným, s.r.o.).

S.r.o. is the most popular type of company in the Czech Republic among small and medium-sized businesses. The minimum authorised capital is CZK 1. The founders (shareholders) are liable only to the extent of their contributions to the authorised capital.

  1. joint-stock company (Akciová společnost, a.s.)

Suitable for large businesses, requires a minimum authorised capital of CZK 2 million for a closed joint-stock company and CZK 20 million for a public joint-stock company. Shareholders have limited liability in proportion to their share in the authorised capital.

  1. Limited liability company (Komanditní společnost, k.s.)

In this form, there are two types of partners: limited partners (contributors) with limited liability within the limits of their contributions, and complementarians (managers) with full liability. This is suitable for family businesses or start-ups looking for investors without the desire to share management responsibilities.

  1. Veřejná obchodní společnost (Veřejná obchodní společnost, v.o.s.)

All partners are fully and jointly liable for the obligations of the company with their personal assets. This form is suitable for small companies with several founders who want to work together under one brand.

  1. European Joint Stock Company (Societas Europaea, SE)

SE allows a company to operate in all countries of the European Union under a single legal form. This is suitable for large companies looking to expand their presence in Europe. The minimum authorised capital is 120,000 euros.

Conclusion

Choosing the right form of legal entity in the Czech Republic depends on many factors, including the size and type of activity of the business, the number of founders, the financing strategy and the willingness of the owners to be liable. Each type of company has its own advantages and limitations, so it is important to carefully analyse all possible options and, if necessary, consult with legal and accounting professionals before making a final decision.

 Tax rates for companies registered in the Czech Republic. The Czech Republic offers favourable conditions for doing business, including a reasonable tax policy. Below is a table with the main tax rates for companies in the Czech Republic.

Name of tax Tax rate
Corporate Income Tax (Corporate Income Tax) 19%
Value Added Tax (VAT) Standard rate – 21%, Reduced rates – 15% and 10% for certain goods and services
Personal Income Tax (Personal Income Tax) Fixed rate – 15%, Progressive rate for high incomes – 23% on incomes over 48 times average salary
Social Security Contributions (Social Security Tax) The total contribution is about 34 per cent of salary (25 per cent paid by the employer and 9 per cent paid by the employee)
Dividend Tax (Dividend Tax) 15% for dividends paid by Czech companies to residents, 35% for dividends paid to non-residents without a double tax treaty.
Average salary 2023 Average salaries are subject to change; it is recommended that you refer to current statistics at the time of enquiry for accurate information.

This data provides an overview of the tax burden on companies in the Czech Republic. It is important to note that tax legislation may be subject to change and there are various tax incentives and exemptions that may apply depending on the specific circumstances of the company. It is always advisable to contact professional tax advisors and accountants for up-to-date information and specialised advice.

 What is the amount of the authorised capital of a company in the Czech Republic?

The amount of the authorised capital of a company is one of the key aspects when establishing a company in the Czech Republic. The authorised capital not only reflects the financial basis of the company, but also determines the extent of the founders’ liability to creditors. In the Czech Republic, the amount of the authorised capital depends on the legal form of the company. In this article, we will look at the minimum authorised capital requirements for the most common types of companies.

  1. limited liability company (Společnost s ručením omezeným, s.r.o.).

For s.r.o., which is the most popular form of company among SMEs in the Czech Republic, the minimum amount of authorised capital is 1 Czech crown (CZK). However, it is important to note that all contributions by the founders must be made before the company is registered and the amount of capital must adequately reflect the planned activities of the company.

  1. joint-stock company (Akciová společnost, a.s.)

For a joint-stock company, the minimum authorised capital is considerably higher and amounts to CZK 2,000,000 for a closed joint-stock company and CZK 20,000,000 for an open joint-stock company. This form is usually chosen by large companies planning to raise capital through the issue of shares.

  1. Limited liability company (Komanditní společnost, k.s.)

For k.s. there is no clear minimum amount of authorised capital established by law. However, the company must determine the size of the contributions of limited partners (limited liability partners) and complementary partners (partners with unlimited liability), which must be reflected in the founding documents.

  1. Veřejná obchodní společnost (Veřejná obchodní společnost, v.o.s.).

Similarly to a limited company, there is no minimum amount of authorised capital for a v.o.s.. What is important is the agreement between the founders on the amount of their contributions and the form in which they are made.

  1. European Joint Stock Company (Societas Europaea, SE)

For SE, which allows a company to operate in all European Union countries under a single legal form, the minimum authorised capital is €120,000. This reflects European standards and is suitable for large international companies.

Conclusion

The choice of the amount of authorised capital for a company in the Czech Republic depends on the chosen form of legal entity and the specifics of the business. Although legislation sets minimum thresholds for certain types of companies, founders should consider the need to adequately capitalise their business to ensure its sustainability and development. Choosing the right amount of authorised capital will help avoid financial difficulties and ensure that the company is perceived positively by banks, investors and business partners.

 Does a company in the Czech Republic have to have a local director?

The question of the need for a local director in a company registered in the Czech Republic is of interest to many foreign investors and entrepreneurs seeking to do business in this country. Czech law sets certain requirements for the governing bodies of companies, including the composition of directors. In this article we will look at whether companies in the Czech Republic require a local director and what are the specifics and requirements for company management.

Requirements for company directors in the Czech Republic

There is no direct requirement in Czech law that a director (executive director or member of the management board) of a company must necessarily be a resident of the Czech Republic. However, there are some aspects that should be taken into account when appointing a foreign national to a managerial position.

Key aspects to consider:

  1. Ability to fulfil duties: The foreign director should be able to visit the Czech Republic on a regular basis to fulfil his/her duties, participate in meetings and interact with Czech state authorities.
  2. Communication: Knowledge of the Czech language is not mandatory, but may be important for effective company management and communication with local authorities and partners.
  3. Registration requirements: Foreign directors must provide the necessary documentation, including proof of identification and, in some cases, a criminal record certificate, to register with the National Court Register (KRS).
  4. Tax aspects: Appointing a foreign national as a director may have tax implications for both the director and the company, especially in terms of income tax and social security.

Advantages of having a local director

While there are no strict requirements, having a local director can provide certain benefits, including:

  • Improved understanding of the local market and legislation.
  • Facilitating communication with government agencies and business partners.
  • Best representation of the company’s interests in the Czech Republic.

Possible alternatives

Companies wishing to retain flexibility in management may consider appointing a foreign director with the granting of power of attorney to a local representative or utilising the services of a professional corporate director in the Czech Republic.

Conclusion

While Czech law does not require a local director to be a mandatory part of the company, such an appointment can provide a number of operational and strategic advantages. Foreign investors should carefully weigh the pros and cons, taking into account their business objectives and governance requirements, before deciding on the governance structure of their company in the Czech Republic.

 What are the state fees for establishing a company in the Czech Republic?

When setting up a company in the Czech Republic, entrepreneurs are faced with the need to pay state fees, which are mandatory payments for the registration of the company in the relevant state registers. The amount of these fees may vary depending on the type of legal entity of the company and other factors. In this article, we will look at the state fees associated with the establishment of different types of companies in the Czech Republic in order to provide entrepreneurs with useful information for planning their business activities.

State fees for company registration in the Czech Republic

Limited Liability Company (Společnost s ručením omezeným, s.r.o.)

Registration of a s.r.o. in the National Court Register (Národní soudní rejstřík) requires the payment of a state fee. As of the latest period of my knowledge, the amount of this fee is CZK 6,000.

Joint Stock Company (Akciová společnost, a.s.)

In order to register a joint stock company with the National Court Register, a fee of CZK 6,000 must be paid.

Limited liability company (Komanditní společnost, k.s.) and Additional Liability Company (Veřejná obchodní společnost, v.o.s.).

The state fee for the registration of these forms of companies is similar and amounts to CZK 2,000.

Individual entrepreneur (Živnostenské podnikání)

For individual entrepreneurs engaged in a licensable type of activity, it may be necessary to pay a licence fee, the amount of which depends on the specific type of activity. In general, registration in the Trade Register for individual entrepreneurs does not require payment of a state fee.

Additional fees and costs

In addition to state fees, there may be other costs involved in setting up a company in the Czech Republic, including notary services for notarisation of incorporation and registration documents, as well as legal and consultancy services.

Conclusion

Government fees are one of the many costs that entrepreneurs face when setting up a company in the Czech Republic. Understanding and planning for these costs in advance helps to ensure a smoother registration process and avoid unforeseen delays. It is also important to recognise that legislation and fees are subject to change, so it is advisable to check the latest information on official resources or consult with representatives from Regulated United Europe before starting the incorporation process.

 What is the annual cost of maintaining a company in the Czech Republic?

The annual cost of maintaining a company in the Czech Republic includes a number of mandatory fees and operating costs that need to be taken into account when planning and running a business. These costs can vary depending on the size of the company, its legal form, area of activity and other factors. In this article, we will look at the main cost items associated with annual company maintenance in the Czech Republic.

Registration and administrative fees

  • Annual fee to the Commercial Register (Obchodní rejstřík): Companies are obliged to pay an annual fee for conducting their business in the Trade Register. The amount of the fee depends on the legal form of the company and other specific conditions.
  • Licence fees: If the company’s activities require special licences or permits, annual licence fees may be charged.

Taxes

  • Corporate income tax: The standard income tax rate in the Czech Republic is 19%. Companies must regularly file a tax return and pay income tax.
  • Value Added Tax (VAT): The rate of VAT in the Czech Republic can vary depending on the type of goods or services, but the standard rate is 21%. Registration as a VAT payer is required when a certain turnover threshold is reached.

Accounting and audit

  • Accountant services: Regular bookkeeping and tax accounting is mandatory. The cost of accounting services depends on the volume of the company’s activities and the complexity of its financial operations.
  • Audits: For large companies or those that meet certain criteria in terms of asset size and turnover, annual audits are required, the cost of which also depends on the size and complexity of the business.

Legal and advisory services

  • Support from lawyers and consultants: The size and complexity of the business may require regular advice on legal, tax and other matters, which is also an expense.

Office and administrative expenses

  • Office rental: Rental costs depend on the location and size of the office space.
  • Utilities and Internet: Regular payments for electricity, water, heating and Internet.
  • Wages and social security: For companies with employees, the main cost items are wages and social security contributions.

Conclusion

The annual cost of maintaining a company in the Czech Republic can vary significantly depending on many factors. It is important for entrepreneurs to carefully plan their financial obligations and consider all possible costs to ensure the sustainable development of their business. Consultation with local accounting, tax and legal experts can help optimise costs and avoid unforeseen financial difficulties.

 What are the main advantages of setting up a company in the Czech Republic?

Establishing a company in the Czech Republic offers foreign investors and local entrepreneurs a number of significant advantages, making this country an attractive place to do business. Due to its strategic location in the centre of Europe, developed infrastructure and stable economy, the Czech Republic offers unique opportunities for business growth and development. In this article, we look at the key advantages of setting up a company in the Czech Republic.

Strategic geographical location

The Czech Republic is located in the heart of Europe, bordering Germany, Austria, Poland and Slovakia, providing easy access to major European markets. This strategic location makes the Czech Republic an ideal country for companies looking to expand their operations on the European continent.

Economic stability

The Czech Republic demonstrates a high level of economic stability supported by a low level of public debt and steady GDP growth. The country is a member of the European Union, which provides additional economic benefits and business opportunities.

Attractive tax system

The Czech Republic offers relatively low tax rates for companies, including a standard income tax rate of 19%. In addition, there are various tax breaks and incentives for investors, especially in the field of research, development and innovation.

High level of education and qualification of the labour force

The Czech Republic is renowned for its highly skilled and well-educated professionals in a variety of sectors, from manufacturing to IT and services. Companies can take advantage of this talent at relatively moderate labour costs.

Developed infrastructure

The Czech Republic has one of the best transport networks in Central Europe, including modern motorways, railway lines and airports. This ensures efficient logistics and access to key markets.

Support for innovation and technological development

The Czech Republic actively supports innovation and high-tech development through a number of government programmes and initiatives aimed at supporting research and development, start-ups and innovative projects.

Access to European funds and grants

As a member of the European Union, the Czech Republic has access to various European funds and grants to finance projects in the fields of infrastructure development, innovation, environment and education.

Conclusion

Establishing a company in the Czech Republic offers great opportunities for international business due to its unique combination of geographical location, economic stability, tax system, skilled labour force and support for innovation. These factors make the Czech Republic one of the most attractive investment and business development destinations in Central Europe.

 What are the different ways to set up a company in the Czech Republic?

Establishing a company in the Czech Republic is a process that can vary depending on the type of legal form of company chosen, the business objectives and the preferences of the founders. There are several ways to incorporate a company in the Czech Republic, each of which has its own features, advantages and requirements. In this article we will look at the main ways of company formation in the Czech Republic to help entrepreneurs choose the most suitable option.

  1. Direct establishment of the company

This traditional method involves preparing and submitting all the necessary documents to the relevant state authorities, including registration in the Commercial Register (Obchodní rejstřík). The process includes:

  • Choosing a company name and checking its uniqueness.
  • Determination of the company’s registered office.
  • Preparation of constituent documents such as articles of association (for a joint stock company) or memorandum of association (for a limited liability company).
  • Determination of the amount of authorised capital.
  • Registration with the Internal Revenue Service and, if applicable, Social Security.
  1. Buying a ready-made company

This method involves the purchase of an already registered “shelf” or ready-made company. Such companies usually have no previous operations and are set up specifically for resale. Advantages include saving time on the registration process and the ability to start business activities immediately. However, this method requires a thorough check of the company’s history and documents.

  1. Registration via the Internet (using the DATA BOX system)

In the Czech Republic it is possible to register companies electronically via the DATA BOX (Datové schránky) system, which speeds up the process and makes it more convenient. For this purpose, founders need to have an electronic signature and access to the system. This method is suitable for entrepreneurs who prefer digital technology and want to minimise personal visits to public authorities.

  1. Use of the services of registration agencies

To simplify the company registration process, founders can use the services of specialised registration agencies that provide a full range of services, including document preparation, filing and interaction with state authorities. This method is ideal for foreign investors and entrepreneurs unfamiliar with local laws and procedures.

Conclusion

The choice of how to set up a company in the Czech Republic depends on many factors, including the urgency of starting a business, preferences for document management and readiness to deal with government authorities. Regardless of the method chosen, it is important to ensure thorough preparation and compliance with all Czech legal requirements to ensure a successful and efficient business start-up in the Czech Republic.

 Is it necessary to have a legal address in the Czech Republic?

The question of the need to have a registered office is a key issue when registering a company in the Czech Republic. The legal address not only reflects the location of the company for government and legal purposes, but also plays an important role in its operational activities. In this article we will take a closer look at why having a legal address is a mandatory requirement in the Czech Republic and what functions it fulfils.

Obligatory legal address

For all legal entities registering in the Czech Republic, having a registered office is a mandatory requirement. This is the address where the company is officially registered and through which legal correspondence is conducted. The legal address must be stated in all official documents of the company, including the memorandum of association, and must be registered in the Commercial Register (Obchodní rejstřík).

Functions of a legal address

  1. Legal identification: The registered office serves to identify the company for legal, tax and administrative purposes.
  2. Correspondence: The registered office receives all official mail, including correspondence from government agencies, tax notices and legal documents.
  3. Registration with government authorities: The registered office is used when registering a company with government authorities, including the tax office and social security system.

How to set up a registered office

  1. Use of actual business address: If a company has a physical office space, this address can be used as a legal address.
  2. Virtual office services: For companies that do not require a permanent physical presence, a virtual office is an option that provides a registered office address and, if necessary, additional services such as mail acceptance and forwarding.
  3. Lease office space: A company can lease office space and use its address as its legal address. This option is suitable for companies that need regular access to the office for meetings with clients and partners.

Legal requirements and restrictions

The choice of a registered office in the Czech Republic is governed by local legislation, which may impose certain requirements or restrictions, for example, regarding the use of residential premises as a company’s registered office. It is important to ensure that the chosen registered office fulfils all requirements and has been properly registered.

Conclusion

A registered office plays a critical role in the life of any company in the Czech Republic, providing legal identification, the ability to receive and send official correspondence and fulfil legal requirements. It is important to choose a legal address carefully, taking into account both the operational needs of the business and the legal requirements.

 Is it possible to open a branch office of a foreign company in the Czech Republic?

Opening a branch office of a foreign company in the Czech Republic represents an attractive opportunity to expand business into the Czech and European markets. With its strategic location in the centre of Europe, stable economy and relatively low operating costs, the Czech Republic is an ideal location for international business. In this article we will look at the key aspects and requirements involved in opening a branch office of a foreign company in the Czech Republic.

The concept of a branch in the Czech Republic

A branch of a foreign company (“pobočka zahraniční společnosti”) in the Czech Republic is considered as an inseparable part of a foreign legal entity, which has the right to carry out activities on behalf of the parent company. The branch does not have the status of a legal entity and acts on the basis of powers delegated by the foreign company.

Basic steps for opening a branch

  1. Preparation of documentation: To register a branch office, a set of documents must be prepared, including the parent company’s incorporation documents, the decision on the establishment of the branch office, a power of attorney for the branch office manager, and notarised translations of these documents into Czech.
  2. Registration in the Trade Register: Documents are submitted to the relevant Trade Register (Obchodní rejstřík) to officially register the branch. This process includes the payment of a registration fee.
  3. Tax registration: The branch must be registered with the Czech tax office to obtain a taxpayer identification number.
  4. Opening a bank account: A bank account must be opened for the financial operations of the branch in the Czech Republic.

Requirements for the branch

  • Branch management: A branch must have a designated manager whose authority is limited by a power of attorney from the parent company.
  • Legal address in the Czech Republic: The branch must have a legal address in the Czech Republic, which is used for official correspondence and registration purposes.
  • Compliance with legislation: The activities of the branch must comply with Czech law, including tax laws, accounting rules and labour law standards.

Advantages of opening a branch

  • Market access: A branch office allows a foreign company to operate directly on the Czech market and take advantage of the local business environment.
  • Tax simplification: As a branch is not a separate legal entity, it can simplify tax reporting and optimise the tax burden.
  • Marketing and brand advantages: The presence of the branch strengthens the brand’s position in the international market and helps to expand the customer base.

Conclusion

Opening a branch office of a foreign company in the Czech Republic is a strategic move that can provide significant advantages for access to the European market. However, the process requires careful preparation, including legal and tax planning. It is important to take into account all the requirements of Czech law and to ensure proper management and control of the branch office.

 Can a foreigner open a company in the Czech Republic?

Opening a company in the Czech Republic by foreign nationals is quite feasible and even welcomed by Czech law, which creates favourable conditions for foreign investors. Due to its strategic location in the heart of Europe, stable economy and attractive business environment, the Czech Republic offers many opportunities for entrepreneurs from different countries. In this article we will look at how a foreigner can open a company in the Czech Republic, what are the steps and requirements, and what advantages Czech law offers.

Steps to start a company in the Czech Republic

  1. Choosing the legal form of the company

Foreign investors can choose one of several forms for their company, including limited liability company (s.r.o.), joint stock company (a.s.), limited liability company (k.s.), and others. The most popular form among small and medium-sized businesses is the s.r.o. because of the relative ease of registration and management, as well as low requirements for the authorised capital.

  1. Preparation of documentation

In order to register a company, it is necessary to prepare the relevant documents, including incorporation documents, proof of the company’s address in the Czech Republic, details of directors and founders. Foreign documents must be properly translated and legalised.

  1. Registration in the Trade Register

The next step is to register the company in the Czech Commercial Register. This can be done through a notary or using online services. After registration, the company receives an identification number (IČO).

  1. Tax registration

Once the company has been incorporated, it is necessary to register with the tax office to obtain a taxpayer number and, if necessary, to register as a VAT payer.

Requirements for foreign investors

Foreign nationals are free to establish and own companies in the Czech Republic and there are no residency requirements. However, a temporary residence permit may be required to manage a company or act as a director.

Advantages of opening a company in the Czech Republic for foreigners

  • Access to the European market: Registering a company in the Czech Republic opens access to the European Union market.
  • Stable economy: The Czech Republic has one of the most stable economies in Central and Eastern Europe.
  • Attractive tax system: The Czech Republic offers competitive tax rates for business.
  • Highly skilled labour force: Access to educated and skilled labour.

Conclusion

Opening a company in the Czech Republic by foreign nationals is a relatively simple and affordable process that offers many advantages for international business. It is important to prepare carefully for the incorporation process, choose the correct legal form of the company and take into account all the requirements of Czech law. Successful company incorporation will allow you to take advantage of the economic and strategic advantages of the Czech Republic as a business location.

 Is it possible to obtain a residence permit when establishing a company in the Czech Republic?

Obtaining a residence permit in the Czech Republic through the establishment of a company is one of the possible ways for foreign entrepreneurs who wish not only to develop their business in the country, but also to establish themselves there for a longer period of time. This process has its own peculiarities, requirements and stages, which must be taken into account for its successful completion. In this article, we will look in detail at how a foreign investor can obtain a residence permit in the Czech Republic based on the establishment of a company.

Basic conditions and requirements

Czech law provides an opportunity for foreign nationals to obtain a residence permit in case of doing business. The main requirements include:

  • Company registration: The first step is to establish and register a company in the Czech Republic. The company must have its registered office in the Czech Republic and fulfil all legal requirements.
  • Proof of financial stability: A foreign entrepreneur must provide proof of his/her financial stability and sufficient funds to conduct business and reside in the Czech Republic.
  • Business Plan: A detailed business plan must be developed and submitted to the relevant authorities, demonstrating the prospects for business development, its objectives, expected profits and job creation for Czech citizens.

Procedure for obtaining a residence permit

  1. Applying: After registering a company, a foreign national can apply for a long-term visa for the purpose of doing business at the Czech embassy or consulate in his or her home country.
  2. Review of the application: The review process may take several months. During this time, additional documents or interviews may be required.
  3. Obtaining a residence permit: Upon approval of the application, the foreign entrepreneur receives a long-term visa, which can then be converted into a residence permit in the Czech Republic.

Advantages of obtaining a residence permit through the establishment of a company

  • Access to the European market: A residence permit not only allows you to do business in the Czech Republic, but also facilitates access to other European Union countries.
  • Right of residence: Obtaining a residence permit entitles you to long-term residence in the Czech Republic, including the possibility of family reunification.
  • Social guarantees: Foreign entrepreneurs with a residence permit are entitled to health care, education and other social guarantees on equal terms with Czech citizens.

Conclusion

Obtaining a residence permit in the Czech Republic through the establishment of a company is an effective way for foreign entrepreneurs to not only develop their business, but also to gain a basis for a long-term stay in the country. It is important to prepare thoroughly for the process, including developing a business plan and ensuring compliance with all legal requirements, in order to maximise the chances of successfully obtaining a residence permit.

What is written in the charter of a company registered in the Czech Republic?

The Charter of a company registered in the Czech Republic is a key constituent document that defines the basic principles of the company’s functioning, its structure, the rights and obligations of the founders and management. The Articles of Association must be drawn up in accordance with Czech law and registered together with the company in the Commercial Register (Obchodn& # x0a; & # x0a; rejst & # x0a; & # x0a;k). The document contains a set of provisions regulating the company’s activities at all levels. In this article, we will look at the main sections and provisions that are usually spelled out in the charter of a company in the Czech Republic.

  1. Basic information about the company
  • Company name: full and abbreviated name, including the legal form of the company.
  • Legal address: the address where the company is registered.
  • Subject of activity: description of the types of activities that the company plans to engage in.
  1. Authorized capital
  • Size of the authorized capital: the amount of the authorized capital and the procedure for its formation are indicated.
  • Founders ‘ shares: information about the shares of each of the founders in the authorized capital.
  1. Company management bodies
  • Founders ‘ Meeting: powers, procedure for convening and holding meetings of founders.
  • Executive Body (Director or Management Board): rights, obligations, and procedures for appointment or revocation.
  • Supervisory Board (if applicable): functions and powers of the Supervisory Board, if its creation is stipulated by the charter.
  1. Distribution of profit and loss
  • Dividend policy: terms and procedure for distributing profits between founders.
  • Loss coverage: the procedure for covering the company’s losses.
  1. Amendments to the Charter and reorganization of the company
  • Procedure for changing the Charter: procedure for making changes to the constituent documents.
  • Reorganization and liquidation: terms and procedure for reorganizing or liquidating the company.
  1. Dispute resolution
  • Dispute resolution procedure: mechanisms for resolving possible conflicts between founders or between founders and the company.
  1. Final provisions
  • Other conditions: any additional provisions specific to the company’s activities or structure that the founders deem necessary to include.

Conclusion

The company’s Charter is a fundamental document that underlies the company’s activities and management. Proper registration of the charter in accordance with Czech legislation and the company’s business objectives ensures transparency of its functioning, protects the rights of the founders and contributes to effective management and business development. It is important to carefully approach the drafting of the charter, taking into account all aspects of the company’s future activities and possible risks.

 How long does it take to set up a company in the Czech Republic?

The establishment of a company in the Czech Republic is a process that can vary in time depending on a number of factors, including the type of legal entity of the company, the preparation of necessary documentation and the effectiveness of interaction with government agencies. In this article, we will look at how long it usually takes to set up various types of companies in the Czech Republic, in order to provide future entrepreneurs with an idea of how to plan their time.

  1. Preparatory stage

Before submitting documents for registration of a company, it is necessary to prepare carefully, including choosing the company name, determining the legal address, preparing statutory documents and resolving issues related to the authorized capital. The preparatory stage may take from several days to several weeks.

  1. Company registration

Limited Liability Company (s.r.o.)

Registration of s.r.o., the most popular form of company in the Czech Republic, usually takes from 5 to 15 business days after all the necessary documents are submitted. This period may be extended if there are any questions or additional requirements from the registration authority.

Joint-stock Company (a.s.)

The process of registering a joint-stock company may be more complex and take from 2 to 4 weeks due to the need to prepare a more extensive set of documents and comply with the requirements for the authorized capital.

  1. Tax registration and obtaining licenses

After registration in the Commercial Register, the company must register with the tax Service and, if necessary, obtain special licenses or permits to conduct its activities. This process may take an additional few days to several weeks.

  1. Opening a bank account

Opening a bank account for the company is mandatory and may take from several days to a week, depending on the bank and the completeness of the prepared documentation.

Total duration of the process

In general, the establishment of a company in the Czech Republic can take from several weeks to a month or even more, if you take into account all the stages-from preparing documents to obtaining all the necessary licenses and opening a bank account. Registration time may vary depending on specific circumstances, the complexity of the documentation collected, and the workload of government agencies.

Conclusion

Establishing a company in the Czech Republic is a relatively straightforward process, but it does require careful preparation and attention to detail. Proper preparation and understanding of all the requirements will help minimize the time required for registration and speed up the start of commercial activities. It is recommended to consult professional legal and accounting advisors to ensure compliance with all the requirements of Czech legislation.

 What activities can companies do in the Czech Republic?

Companies in the Czech Republic can engage in a variety of activities due to the attractive investment climate, the high level of education of the population, as well as the country’s geographical location in the center of Europe. Here are some areas that companies in the Czech Republic can do:

  1. IT and technology

The Czech Republic is actively developing the ITsector, attracting world leaders in the field of information technology and supporting local startups. Software developers, mobile applications, as well as specialists in the field of artificial intelligence and machine learning are concentrated in the country.

  1. Production

Strong industrial traditions and favorable location make the Czech Republic attractive for manufacturing companies. The automotive industry is one of the leading industries, along with mechanical engineering, electrical engineering and food production.

  1. Tourism and hospitality

The rich cultural heritage, beautiful nature and high-quality services attract tourists from all over the world to the Czech Republic. Hotels, restaurants, travel agencies and companies offering entertainment and excursions find fertile ground for development here.

  1. Research and development

The Czech Republic offers good opportunities for research projects and developments in various fields, from pharmaceuticals to innovative materials. The Government supports research and innovation through various programs and grants.

  1. Export and import

Due to its Central European location, the Czech Republic acts as an important trade hub. Companies that export and import goods can benefit from a well-developed logistics infrastructure and favorable trade agreements.

  1. Financial and advisory services

The financial services sector is also represented in the Czech Republic. Banks, insurance companies, investment funds, and consulting companies offer their services to both local and international clients.

  1. Energy and Ecology

In the energy sector, the Czech Republic relies on the development of renewable energy sources and sustainable development. Companies operating in the alternative energy, energy efficiency and clean technology sectors have great potential for growth.

Conclusion

The Czech Republic offers favorable conditions for business development in a wide variety of areas. Government support, qualified personnel, developed infrastructure and access to European markets make this country attractive for investors and entrepreneurs from all over the world.

 Should a company in the Czech Republic have employees?

In the Czech Republic, there is no general legal requirement that every company must have employees. Many individual entrepreneurs and small businesses successfully operate without hiring staff, relying on their own resources or outsourcing. However, depending on the sector of activity and the specifics of the business, there may be certain regulations or licensing requirements that require the availability of qualified employees. For example, working in the field of education, medicine, construction, or transportation may require the presence of full-time specialists with appropriate education and qualifications.

Types of companies and personnel requirements

The requirements for the availability of employees may also vary depending on the form of ownership of the company. For example, joint-stock companies may require an executive director or a board of directors, while individual entrepreneurs and owners of private limited liability companies may not have the same strict requirements.

Strategic and operational considerations

From the point of view of strategy and operational efficiency, the presence or absence of employees in a company in the Czech Republic will depend on many factors, including the scope and specifics of the work, the need for specialized skills, as well as long-term business goals. Companies seeking to expand and capture the market may need to have qualified employees to ensure growth and competitiveness. At the same time, startups and small businesses can rely on outsourcing and freelancing to complete individual tasks and projects, minimizing fixed personnel costs.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the question of whether a company in the Czech Republic should have employees is largely determined by the specific goals and conditions of doing business. Czech legislation provides flexibility in this aspect, allowing entrepreneurs to choose the most appropriate model depending on their needs and strategic objectives. However, it is important to carefully review all relevant legal and licensing requirements, as well as assess the need for qualified employees for successful business development.

 How do I choose a company name in the Czech Republic?

Choosing a name for a company in the Czech Republic is a key step in the process of creating a business. Choosing the right name not only helps your company stand out in the market, but also plays an important role in forming the first impression of potential customers. Here are some recommendations that will help you choose a name for your company in the Czech Republic:

  1. Compliance with the company’s activities

The name should reflect the essence of your company’s activities, be clear and memorable. This will help potential customers immediately understand what services or products you offer.

  1. Uniqueness

Before choosing a name, make sure that it is not used by other companies in the Czech Republic. To do this, you can use online services for checking trademarks and trade names, for example, the database of the Czech Patent Office (Úřad průmyslového vlastnictvvlastnictv î). A unique name will help you avoid legal problems and conflicts with other entrepreneurs.

  1. Easy pronunciation and memorization

Choose a name that is easy to pronounce and remember for both Czech and foreign clients. Avoid complex and long words, as well as non-standard combinations of letters that can make it difficult to find your company on the Internet.

  1. Checking domain name availability

In the digital age, having a company website is an essential part of your business. Make sure that the domain in the zone is available for the selected name .cz or another suitable domain zone. You can do this using domain registration services.

  1. Cultural and linguistic adaptation

Take into account the cultural and linguistic peculiarities of the Czech Republic. Avoid using words that may be misinterpreted or have negative connotations. In some cases, it may be advisable to choose a name that sounds good in both Czech and English, especially if you plan to work in the international market.

  1. Opinions of potential customers

Before making a final choice, it may be useful to conduct a survey among potential customers or the target audience. This will help you understand how attractive and understandable the chosen name is for your target audience.

Conclusion

Choosing a name for a company in the Czech Republic requires a careful approach and consideration of many factors. A unique, easy-to-remember name that matches the company’s activities and strategic goals will become an important asset of your business and help lay the foundation for its successful development in the Czech market.

 Business Register in the Czech Republic

The Business Register in the Czech Republic, known as “Obchodn& rejst&k”, plays a key role in the country’s economic environment, ensuring transparency and access to information about all registered companies. This register not only helps build trust between business communities and consumers, but also ensures that companies meet their legal and financial obligations. Here is a detailed overview of the Czech Business Register, including its functions, registration process, and access to information.

Main function of the Business Register

The Business Register in the Czech Republic is an official database containing information about all legal entities, entrepreneurs and other business entities operating in the country. The register provides basic information, such as the legal name of the company, identification number (IČ/ O), legal address, information about managers, the main subject of activity, as well as information about any registered branches or representative offices.

Registration process

To be included in the Business Register, a company must go through the registration procedure, which begins with the submission of relevant documents to the registration court. The process may vary depending on the type of legal entity, but generally includes:

  1. Preparation of constituent documents (for example, the charter or foundation agreement).
  2. Obtaining an enterprise identification number (IČ/ O) from the tax authority.
  3. Payment of the state registration fee.
  4. Submission of the application and related documents to the registration court.

After checking the information and documents provided, the registration court enters the company’s data in the Business Register.

Access to information

Information from the Business Register is available to the public via the Internet on the register’s official website. This allows anyone to access data about registered companies in the Czech Republic. The register can be searched by company name, identification number, or legal address.

Value for business and the economy

The business register provides an important role in maintaining the transparency of the business environment, providing the necessary information for conducting market research, analyzing competitors, checking potential partners or investments. It also serves as a tool to prevent financial fraud and build trust between businesses and consumers.

Conclusion

The Business Register in the Czech Republic plays a central role in creating an enabling environment for doing business, ensuring transparency and accessibility of information about companies. It is an important resource for entrepreneurs, investors, and the public, helping to develop the economy and strengthen the rule of law in business practices.

If you are contemplating the establishment of a company in the Czech Republic, the specialists at Regulated United Europe are on hand to evaluate the prospects for success in your particular case. Our skilled professionals can also provide insights into alternative options that align well with your business goals. Regardless of the stage of your business formation and operation, from document preparation to assisting with the day-to-day activities of your newly established entity, we are prepared to offer support. Contact us for more detailed consultations.

Diana

“Establishing a business in the Czech Republic is a streamlined process, indicative of its welcoming business environment. As a specialist in this field, I am well-equipped to assist you. Feel free to reach out for more information or guidance.”

Diana Pärnaluik

SENIOR ASSOCIATE

email2[email protected]

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

To register a company in the Czech Republic, it is crucial to follow a comprehensive legal process and submit the required documentation. This involves selecting a unique company name and providing a registered address, supported by a lease agreement. Furthermore, a detailed description of business activities, preparation of Memorandum and Articles of Association, obtaining a certificate of trade authorization, securing sample signatures from shareholders and directors, demonstrating evidence of capital in a bank, and providing criminal record extracts for each company member are essential components of the registration process.

The duration for establishing a company in the Czech Republic can vary based on factors such as the complexity of the process, the efficiency in document submission, and the responsiveness of local authorities. Generally, the entire registration process, spanning from document preparation to the issuance of the Certificate of Incorporation, may take approximately 3 to 4 weeks, contingent upon the intricacies of the application.

For company formation in the Czech Republic, you'll need a chosen name, registered office address with proof, description of business activities, Memorandum and Articles of Association (MAA), certificate of trade authorization, sample signatures from shareholders and directors, evidence of capital in a bank, and criminal record extracts. Additional documents may be required based on circumstances.

Yes, non-residents can own a company in the Czech Republic. The establishment of Czech Republic companies is open to both natural persons and legal entities without specific residency restrictions.

Yes, non-residents are eligible to be part of the board of a Czech Republic company. The law requires at least one director for a company in the Czech Republic, with no specific residency requirements.

A Czech Republic company must have a minimum of one shareholder, and there is no maximum limit on the number of shareholders. Additionally, the company should have at least one managing director.

The share capital requirements for company registration in the Czech Republic are CZK 1 for s.r.o's (limited liability companies) and CZK 2,000,000 for a.s. (joint-stock companies). There is no minimum capital requirement for branches of foreign companies.

The Corporate Tax Rate in the Czech Republic is set at 21 percent. This tax is collected from companies based on the net income they generate while conducting their business activities throughout a business year. It's advisable to consult with a tax professional for specific details as there may be variations in tax regulations.

Yes, companies in the Czech Republic are obligated to maintain proper accounting records in accordance with Czech Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) for tax purposes. Alternatively, they may reconcile their financial statements under International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) as adopted by the EU to Czech GAAP. Czech GAAP provides the necessary accounting instructions for specific transactions. For detailed information on accounting procedures in the Czech Republic, it is recommended to consult with a professional accounting service.

The ultimate beneficial owner of a company, defined by the Czech AML Act, must be registered in the Commercial Register. This refers to a natural person with over 25% capital or voting rights. If identification is challenging, a presumption exists for publicly listed joint stock companies. Details are generally undisclosed but may be inferred from the Commercial Register. Managing directors and shareholders' identities are publicly disclosed in the Commercial Register, except for joint stock companies where shareholder details remain private unless there's only one shareholder, in which case, their identity is disclosed.

RUE customer support team

Milana
Milana

“Hi, if you are looking to start your project, or you still have some concerns, you can definitely reach out to me for comprehensive assistance. Contact me and let’s start your business venture.”

Sheyla

“Hello, I’m Sheyla, ready to help with your business ventures in Europe and beyond. Whether in international markets or exploring opportunities abroad, I offer guidance and support. Feel free to contact me!”

Sheyla
Diana
Diana

“Hello, my name is Diana and I specialise in assisting clients in many questions. Contact me and I will be able to provide you efficient support in your request.”

Polina

“Hello, my name is Polina. I will be happy to provide you with the necessary information to launch your project in the chosen jurisdiction – contact me for more information!”

Polina

CONTACT US

At the moment, the main services of our company are legal and compliance solutions for FinTech projects. Our offices are located in Vilnius, Prague, and Warsaw. The legal team can assist with legal analysis, project structuring, and legal regulation.

Company in Lithuania UAB

Registration number: 304377400
Anno: 30.08.2016
Phone: +370 661 75988
Email: [email protected]
Address: Lvovo g. 25 – 702, 7th floor, Vilnius,
09320, Lithuania

Company in Poland Sp. z o.o

Registration number: 38421992700000
Anno: 28.08.2019
Phone: +48 50 633 5087
Email: [email protected]
Address: Twarda 18, 15th floor, Warsaw, 00-824, Poland

Regulated United Europe OÜ

Registration number: 14153440–
Anno: 16.11.2016
Phone: +372 56 966 260
Email:  [email protected]
Address: Laeva 2, Tallinn, 10111, Estonia

Company in Czech Republic s.r.o.

Registration number: 08620563
Anno: 21.10.2019
Phone: +420 775 524 175
Email:  [email protected]
Address: Na Perštýně 342/1, Staré Město, 110 00 Prague

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